Faculty & Research

Ann L. McGill

Sears Roebuck Professor of General Management, Marketing and Behavioral Science

Phone :
(773) 702-7448
Address :
5807 South Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637

Ann L. McGill's research focus is consumer and manager decision making, with special emphasis causal reasoning, consumer evaluations of products and services consumed alone or with others, the influence of freedom of choice on outcome satisfaction, and product and brand anthropomorphism. "My research enhances our understanding of how people think, which makes it easier to reach and help them," she explains.

McGill has held teaching positions at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management and New York University. McGill passed her CPA examination in 1980 and worked as an auditor for Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Co. in Detroit. This professional experience helps in the classroom by allowing her to build bridges from concept to application.

Besides teaching and advising several PhD candidates, McGill is editor of the Journal of Consumer Research, a member of the American Marketing Association, the Association of Consumer Research, the Society of Experimental Social Psychologists, and the Society for Judgment and Decision Making. She is a former associate editor for the Journal of Consumer Research.

McGill won the 2005 McKinsey Award for Excellence in Teaching at the University of Chicago. The award exemplifies her teaching philosophy as she wants her students to walk away with a sense of when to apply these factors to their endeavors and the ability to keep learning.

She received a BBA with high distinction from the University of Michigan in 1979, an MBA from the Chicago Booth in 1985, and a PhD, also from Chicago Booth, in 1986. She joined the Chicago faculty in 1997.

 

2013 - 2014 Course Schedule

Number Name Quarter
37000 Marketing Strategy 2013 (Fall)

Research Activities

Consumer and manager decision making with special emphasis on causal reasoning, consumer evaluations of products and services consumed alone or with others, the influence of freedom of choice on outcome satisfaction, and product and brand anthropomorphism.

With Pankaj Aggarwal, “When Brands Seem Human, Do Humans Act Like Brands? Automatic Priming Effects for Anthropomorphized Brands, Journal of Consumer Research (forthcoming).

With Sara Kim, “Gaming with Mr. Slot or Gaming the Slot Maching? Power, Anthropomorphism, and Risk Perception, Journal of Consumer Research (2011).

With Claire Tsai, “No Pain, No gain? How Fluency and Constural Level Affect Consumer Confidence,” Journal of Consumer Research (2011).

With Jan R. Landwehr and Andreas Herrmann, “It’s Got the Look: The Effect of Friendly and Aggressive ‘Facial’ Expressions on Product Liking and Sales,” Journal of Marketing (2011).

With Simona Botti, “Locus of Choice: Personal Causality and Satisfaction with Hedonic and Utilitarian Decisions,” Journal of Consumer Research (2011).

With David Faro and Reid Hastie, “Naïve Theories of Causal Force and Compression of Elapsed Time,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (2010).

With Suresh Ramanathan, "Consuming with Others: Social Influences on Moment-to-Moment and Retrospective Evaluations of an Experience," Journal of Consumer Research (2008).

For a listing of research publications please visit ’s university library listing page.

New: No Pain, No Gain? How Fluency and Construal Level Affect Consumer Confidence
Date Posted: Jun  28, 2010
Choice confidence is affected by fluency and moderated by construal levels that evoke different theories to interpret the feelings of fluency. At lower construal levels, fluency informs the feasibility of completing the concrete steps of the decision process to choose well, but at higher construal levels, fluency informs (insufficient) effort invested for the desirability of the outcome. After manipulating fluency by varying font or number of thoughts recalled, fluency increased confidence for p

REVISION: The Role of Naïve Causal Beliefs in the Compression of Elapsed Time Judgments
Date Posted: Jan  30, 2010
Recent research has shown that the perception of causality results in a temporal binding of events and a compression of elapsed time judgments. The present work shows that a naïve mechanical-physical conception of causality, in which causal forces are believed to dissipate over time, underlies the temporal compression effect. Being primed with alternative, non-dissipative causal mechanisms, and having the cognitive capacity to consider such mechanisms, moderates the compression effect. The studi

Consuming with Others: Social Influences on Moment-to-Moment and Retrospective Evaluations of Experi
Date Posted: Feb  15, 2006
Two studies examine differences in participants' moment-to-moment and retrospective evaluations of an experience depending on whether they are alone or in the presence of another person. Findings for the first study reveal that moment-to-moment evaluations by participants who watched a film clip together covaried in patterns consistent with processes of mimicry and emotional contagion. Retrospective evaluations of the experience were influenced by this degree of co-movement, suggesting that a se