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Biography

Matthew J. Notowidigdo studies a broad set of topics in labor economics and health economics. In labor economics, his research has focused on understanding the causes and consequences of long-term unemployment and the economic effects of unemployment insurance over the business cycle. Notowidigdo’s research in health economics focuses on the effects of public health insurance on labor supply and the effects of income on health spending. He is currently working with several state governments on large-scale randomized experiments of existing social insurance programs.

Outside of academia, Notowidigdo has corporate experience as an associate at Lehman Brothers in the Fixed Income Division, and he has consulted for several professional sports teams on ticket pricing. Within academia he has teaching experience at both the undergraduate and graduate level, and he was honored with the distinction of the Carleton E. Tucker Award for Teaching Excellence in 2004.

Notowidigdo studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before joining Chicago Booth in 2010 as an Assistant Professor. In 2014, he joined the Department of Economics at Northwestern University as Associate Professor of Economics. In 2020, Notowidigo returned to Booth as Professor of Economics. He holds a BS in economics, a BS in computer engineering, a MEng in computer science, and a PhD in economics. He is currently a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economics Research, and he is a co-editor at American Economic Journal - Economic Policy Notowidigdo and an Associate Editor at the Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Research Interests

Labor economics, public finance, health economics.

Academic Areas

  • Microeconomics

Selected Publications

Working Papers

2021 - 2022 Course Schedule

Number Course Title Quarter
33350 Health Economics 2022 (Winter)
33918 Topics in Labor Economics 2022 (Spring)