2017

Stories related to "Perspectives". http://www.chicagobooth.edu/magazine/spring-2017/rss

perspectives

The Book of Booth: Sinuhe Arroyo, ’11 (EXP-16)

Armed with a PhD in artificial intelligence from the University of Innsbruck, Taiger founder and CEO Sinuhe Arroyo, ’11 (EXP-16), came to Booth to hone his vision of building a global AI business. The result: a company that has offices in five countries and is becoming a global leader in cognitive automation for the financial sector. CBM: What was the genesis of your idea for Taiger? Arroyo: After completing my PhD and my first acquisition, I realized that I wanted to build my own business and play to my strengths. I took some of the research that I had been doing during my PhD and started building a product. In that sense, we are a textbook case of technology transfer from academia to business. Because I had a strong academic background, the transition to run a business was not necessarily easy. However, the Executive MBA Program helped me put the pieces of the puzzle together. You start realizing how you can assemble the business, and everything starts to make sense. You think, “Why is this not working? Why is this like that? Boom, that’s why it’s not working.” And then it just flows. That’s a beautiful feeling. CBM: How did the Executive MBA Program help you acquire new customers? Arroyo: It boils down to building trust and negotiating. I am constantly negotiating with customers, providers, employees, partners, and investors. Professor Lars Stole set the foundations for me to understand and think in pure economic terms with his Microeconomics class. Also, I really enjoyed my Negotiations class with professor Ayelet Fishbach, where all those concepts from Micro come to life. It was very beneficial to understand the different approaches and mechanisms you can use to negotiate. <br/>

perspectives

Chicago-style Economics in China

Qi Bin, ’97, has spent nearly two decades at the heart of China’s market liberalization. When he came to Booth, he decided to pursue an MBA over a PhD. “I believed that China someday would have to build a more advanced economic system,” said Qi, now Executive Vice President of the 10-year-old China Investment Corporation (CIC), the country’s sovereign wealth fund with more than $200 billion in registered capital and $810 billion in domestic assets. “Modern China would need people who understand free-market economics, and I could be one of them.”

perspectives

An Array of Talents

“Coming from an entrepreneurial family, I knew I would be starting companies,” said Shruti Gandhi, ’12. And in 2015, Gandhi founded a San Francisco–based venture capital firm, Array Ventures. While completing her undergraduate degree in computer science at Marist College, Gandhi worked full time at IBM as a software engineer, and she earned an MS in computer science from Columbia University. At Booth, Gandhi discovered a passion for venture capital, landing in venture capital roles after graduation, including at Silicon Valley–based True Ventures and Samsung’s Early Stage Fund in the Bay Area. Chicago Booth Magazine connected with Gandhi to discuss her passion for startups and the edge her Booth experience gives her in the high-stress world of venture capital.

perspectives

This is Working for Me: Heather Brilliant, ’05

A financial whiz who studied economics at Northwestern, Heather Brilliant, ’05, worked full time as an equity analyst while attending Booth’s Evening MBA Program. After rising to the role of Morningstar’s global director of equity and corporate credit research, Brilliant moved from Chicago to Sydney in 2014 to take the role of CEO of Morningstar Australasia. Brilliant is passionate about Morningstar’s mission to help investors reach their financial goals. “Whether we are working with advisers, asset managers, or directly with an investor, we always have the end investor in mind as true north, guiding our decision making.”

perspectives

Living on the Edge

Pavel Rodionov’s idea of a perfect vacation doesn’t involve luxury accommodations, five-star dinners, or guided sightseeing tours. “I like to travel, but I don’t like typical touristy places,” said Rodionov, who graduated from Booth’s Executive MBA Program in 2013. “I prefer expeditions, like the North Pole.” In April 2014, Rodionov and his wife, Tatiana, spent six days making a 69-mile trek to the pole—on skis. They embarked on their adventure from Barneo Ice Camp, a fly-in basecamp atop the frozen Arctic Ocean. The couple traversed open ice fields, braved windchills reaching below -30 degrees Celsius, and slept in a tent. “I wouldn’t say we were afraid, but on the second day, I lost all my energy and all my strength,” Rodionov said. He had to spend several hours in a tent, warming up and having some food and drink, before he was able to keep going. When the couple arrived at the North Pole, he planted the Booth flag.<br/>

perspectives

At Home, Abroad

Kendra Mirasol, ’93, had one major goal while growing up in Janesville, Wisconsin. “I remember always wanting to get out,” she said. She studied German in high school and moved across country for college at the University of California, Irvine. During college, Mirasol worked in a hotel in Lindenberg, a small Bavarian mountain town. “They spoke zero English,” she says. “It was so fantastic for exposure learning. You had to sink or swim.” After graduation, in 1989, just before the Berlin Wall fell, Mirasol lived in Kranichfeld, East Germany. She stayed with a pen pal whose family struggled to get by under Communist rule. “They were basket weavers—they got paid $1 per basket.” While attempting to leave the country, she was interrogated at the border for three hours because she forgot to file the correct paperwork at the police station. <br/>“Those are exciting experiences,” said Mirasol, now president of IOR Global Services, a global mobility and talent development solutions company. Without work- and study-abroad programs, she said, “My life would be so boring.” Mirasol came to Chicago Booth to supplement her German literature and language background with business acumen. She was able to maintain a global perspective during her interactions with international students. Mirasol could tell that a good friend of hers from Japan struggled to adapt to the direct, unfiltered mode of classroom discussion favored by some American classmates. “It was so difficult for him to even contribute one idea,” she recalled. “He was probably the smartest man in the school, and when I saw that happening, I felt I had a responsibility to facilitate.” These types of cross-cultural support are needed every day, around the world, on a personal level, and in boardrooms. In April 2016, Mirasol’s passion for international exchange—and for the broader benefits of a global economy—motivated her to accept a volunteer role on the board of directors at the nonprofit Cultural Vistas. <br/>

perspectives

The Greater China Forum Returns to Beijing

This fall, the University of Chicago and Chicago Booth present the Greater China Forum, hosted by the Chicago Booth Alumni Club of China, taking place September 2–3, 2017, in Beijing. The two-day event features keynote speakers Robert Zimmer, president of the University of Chicago, and Lou Jiwei, chairman of China’s National Social Security Fund, former finance minister of China, and former chairman and CEO of China Investment Corporation. Incoming Booth dean of students Madhav Rajan and Katherine Dusak Miller Distinguished Service Professor of Finance Raghuram G. Rajan are also speaking at the Forum.