2017

Stories related to "My Offsite".

perspectives

The Groundwork: A Window on Retail

The average American spends more than 200 hours a year commuting. These are notoriously stressful hours for most, usually spent stuck in traffic or crammed into subway cars. But Davidkhanian has managed to make her morning and evening commutes highlights of her day. For the eight years she’s worked at Macy’s—first as an associate in the merchandising office, now as vice president of market trends—Davidkhanian has walked the 1.2 miles from her home in Midtown Manhattan to her Herald Square office, invaluable 30-minute city adventures. “It feels like I never take the same route twice,” Davidkhanian said during a walk on a sunny morning in late June. Her one regular stop: coffee at Essen on Madison Avenue and 41st Street. “I follow the traffic lights, rain or shine, unless it’s freezing out. It never gets boring.” There’s an undeniable value in analog moments of observation—turning attention to the kind of infinitely varied scenes that unfold in real life versus on a screen. And some studies have shown that walking, like running and other forms of cardio, can help reduce stress as powerfully

perspectives

Flights of Fancy

Twice a month, Yves Dehouck, ’10 (AXP-9), lugs a two-pound mass of finely tuned propellers, circuitry, and a lens out to a plot of land near his home and sends it off into the heavens. Well, not heavens. As an enthusiastic amateur drone photographer, Dehouck is well aware of the safety regulations that come with his chosen hobby. The rule, he said, is “if you fly the drone, you should be able to see it.” So he aims for the sweet spot: low enough to keep out of trouble, but high enough to capture the sweeping vistas of the world below. It’s a pastime he discovered by way of a lifelong fascination with aviation. Born and raised a stone’s throw from Koksijde Air Base in Belgium, Dehouck grew up wanting to fly helicopters. However, as a young child, Dehouck wore glasses, which was a no-go if you wanted to fly. He thought his dream of becoming an aviator had already crashed and burned.

perspectives

In Search of the New Economy

Day in and day out for four years, Elatia Abate, AB ’99, MBA ’08, interviewed people who were going through the motions. As a senior human resources executive in the corporate world, she met with candidates applying for a position, but whom she suspected weren’t actually interested in the job. <br/><br/>It’s a problem that cuts across industries: a survey conducted of 17,000 American workers in 19 industries by the nonprofit groups Mental Health America and the Faas Foundation found that 71 percent of respondents didn’t like their jobs. Their passions—and, as Abate would come to realize, her passions—lay elsewhere.<br/>“I was tired of meeting people who were fabulous but not interested in the work they were doing,” said Abate, quietly admitting out loud that she wasn’t interested in her work either.<br/><br/>So she did what many people dream of doing but few people actually do: she jumped ship. Abate launched her own freelance executive coaching business. Then, in January 2017, she hit the road, embarking on a year of remote work to get a firsthand perspective on the changing nature of today’s economy. She packed her entire life into a storage unit, with the exception of a carry-on bag and a suitcase, and set off.

perspectives

Living on the Edge

Pavel Rodionov’s idea of a perfect vacation doesn’t involve luxury accommodations, five-star dinners, or guided sightseeing tours. “I like to travel, but I don’t like typical touristy places,” said Rodionov, who graduated from Booth’s Executive MBA Program in 2013. “I prefer expeditions, like the North Pole.” In April 2014, Rodionov and his wife, Tatiana, spent six days making a 69-mile trek to the pole—on skis. They embarked on their adventure from Barneo Ice Camp, a fly-in basecamp atop the frozen Arctic Ocean. The couple traversed open ice fields, braved windchills reaching below -30 degrees Celsius, and slept in a tent. “I wouldn’t say we were afraid, but on the second day, I lost all my energy and all my strength,” Rodionov said. He had to spend several hours in a tent, warming up and having some food and drink, before he was able to keep going. When the couple arrived at the North Pole, he planted the Booth flag.<br/>

perspectives

Following Her Own Tune

When Julie DeLoyd, ’11, first came to Chicago Booth, she may well have been the only incoming student with a background in queer performance studies—an undergraduate major she designed herself at New York University. “Basically, the only thing it prepared me to do was become a lesbian folk singer,” she cracked. That’s precisely what she did for almost a decade, touring the country and singing in clubs 175 days a year. At Booth, she felt she stuck out among more traditional MBAs like an A-sharp in a C-chord—at least at first.

perspectives

In It for the Long Run

Hong Kong is famous for its glinting skyscrapers, many designed by the world’s most famous architects, and its collection of luxury retailers and five-star hotels. Yet there is another side to the city—a huge network of trails forged through the lush tropical landscape, where palm-sized orb weavers spin webs across the paths, deadly pit vipers and cobras slither, and monkeys, feral dogs, and wild buffalo roam. Perhaps it is a testament to the intensity of navigating Hong Kong’s busy and hyper competitive financial sector that ducking under spider webs and hopping over snakes can seem relaxing in comparison.

perspectives

Carving His Niche

There’s a crowd in the living room at the upstate New York farmhouse of artist John Cross, ’60. Next to an opera star, there’s a woman playing a viola. Nearby are two swimmers, one in a swan dive. Of course, these figures are all sculptures that Cross, a retired advertising executive, has carved from soft Sugar Pine wood. “They’re poised, getting ready to act,” Cross said of his creations. “I like that about carving, as opposed to trying to create a gesture of running or speed.” The passion that started with Cross’s childhood hobby of whittling has evolved into a successful art career. Having exhibited in numerous galleries in New York and beyond since the 1970s, Cross has a new show opening December 20, 2016, at the National Arts Club in Manhattan.<br/>