2016

Stories related to "Perspectives". http://www.chicagobooth.edu/magazine/fall-2016/rss

perspectives

The Book of Booth: David Booth, ’71

In recognition of the largest gift to any business school in the world, the GSB became Chicago Booth in 2008. David Booth, ’71, serves as a lifetime member of the school’s business advisory council and on the Board of Trustees of the University of Chicago. A true path breaker, Booth this year made Forbes’s list of the 40 “Money Masters: The Most Powerful People in the Financial World,” and Institutional Investor honored him with the Manager Lifetime Achievement Award. CBM sat down with Booth in Austin, Texas, at Dimensional’s home office, for his take on leadership, impact, and the value of an MBA. How did Eugene Fama, MBA ’63, PhD ’64, help shape your career? I went to the University of Chicago for the PhD program. I was going to be a professor. After taking Fama’s class and then working for him, I realized I probably didn’t have what it takes to be a leading academic. I decided that my strength was in applying the concepts rather than necessarily trying to think up the next great idea.<br/>

perspectives

This is Working for Me: Carla Dunham, AM ’98, MBA ’03

Carla Dunham first arrived in Hyde Park not to study business but with the intention to graduate from the University of Chicago art history department with a PhD and become a professor. After completing a master’s degree in art history, Dunham switched gears and applied to Booth. “I was intrigued by the opportunity to take my career out of the library and into the larger world,” recalled Dunham, vice president of global brand strategy at Kate Spade New York. After Booth, Dunham tackled successively bigger roles at Target, Henri Bendel, Saks Fifth Avenue, and Amazon before moving to Kate Spade New York. Based in Manhattan with her husband and son, Dunham leads the team responsible for driving brand awareness across all marketing channels globally.<br/>

perspectives

A Workday With Todd Connor, ’07

According to Todd Connor, ’07, about 25 percent of the 250,000 active duty service members who get out of the military each year want to start their own business. In March 2013, Connor cofounded Chicago-based Flank 5 Academy, a personal incubator aimed at helping people launch a new career or business. The following year, he founded Bunker Labs, a Chicago-based organization that helps military veterans start and grow businesses. Military veterans and entrepreneurs like Connor now helm the 12 active Bunker Labs chapters throughout the United States, focused on expanding an ecosystem to support military veteran entrepreneurship in their communities.

perspectives

Booth 101: An Introduction to Beer Pairing

In the back of an Illinois-based taproom, Jamie Hoban, ’02, stands next to a cluster of wooden pallets. Heavy-duty shrink-wrap envelops each of the pallets, which are stacked in rows as high as a basketball hoop in order to protect their fragile contents: thousands of empty beer bottles. These vessels won’t be empty for long. Hoban and his business partners, Brian Schafer and Andy Smith, will soon fill them with Angry Dragon Pale Ale, Pink Tie Saison, Milk & Cookies, and other wildly inventive (and wildly tasty) beers made by their growing business, Ten Ninety Brewing Company.

perspectives

The Courage of Conviction

There’s nobody who can’t be wrong, and I know that from what the University of Chicago taught me. As a student, I earned a sense of confidence that you could point out something you might disagree with. Attending my 50-year reunion reminded me of the life skills I learned while earning an MBA. In my second year of the program, I was taking a class from George Stigler, PhD ’38 (Economics), who would go on to win the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1982. I wrote a paper that was good but only five pages long. I couldn’t turn in such a short paper, so I added another 13 pages of whatever I could. He returned my paper and summarized my work in two sentences: he liked it, but the first 13 pages were worthless. He was recognizing the paper for what it was, and I liked him for that. <br/>

perspectives

Carving His Niche

There’s a crowd in the living room at the upstate New York farmhouse of artist John Cross, ’60. Next to an opera star, there’s a woman playing a viola. Nearby are two swimmers, one in a swan dive. Of course, these figures are all sculptures that Cross, a retired advertising executive, has carved from soft Sugar Pine wood. “They’re poised, getting ready to act,” Cross said of his creations. “I like that about carving, as opposed to trying to create a gesture of running or speed.” The passion that started with Cross’s childhood hobby of whittling has evolved into a successful art career. Having exhibited in numerous galleries in New York and beyond since the 1970s, Cross has a new show opening December 20, 2016, at the National Arts Club in Manhattan.<br/>

perspectives

Fracking: An Explosive History

In 1862, a man named Edward A. L. Roberts was fighting against the Confederate army during the Battle of Fredericksburg. The lieutenant colonel noticed the effects of torpedoes hitting a nearby river. He survived the battle and left the armed services a year later, but his torpedo observation remained on his mind. Three years later, the lieutenant colonel launched the Roberts Petroleum Torpedo Company, having invented a new way to extract oil and gas from the ground. He patented his invention as “the Exploding Torpedo.”