Alumni

Alumni Leader Resources

Four Booth alumnae smile at the camera A group of Chicago Booth alumni chat
Large group of Chicago Booth alumni mingle Five Booth alumni smile at the camera

Welcome and thank you for your interest in being an alum volunteer, board member, or leader in a Chicago Booth alumni club or affinity organization.

If you are not yet a leader, but are interested in volunteering, please fill out this form. You can read about more of our volunteer opportunities here.

If you have recently became a volunteer, or joined a local alumni board, this is an exciting time for you to grow, learn, and create a big impact in your alumni community. The alumni relations team is here to help with guidance, context, and historical data for your market.

To best understand how we operate, you should familiarize yourself with our Alumni Leader Resources below.

To jumpstart ideas and to learn what makes a great leader, please review all of the resources we offer in this section, as they provide guidelines, templates, and decades of best practices.

General overview & expectations

Chicago Booth has a community of 55,000 alumni globally and many clubs and organizations. We also have class or cohort based opportunities to volunteer. As you might expect, Chicago is our largest alumni market, but our community extends to hundreds of cities across the globe. Your events and activities should mirror your market in size. Alumni relations will strategically partner with you to drive success.

What makes a club successful?

Successful clubs are driven by alumni volunteers who care about connecting alumni to other alumni, extending the thought leadership of the school through events, and are able to plan and lead boards of other volunteers whose common mission is to build the alumni community. Alumni relations evaluates club health on four major key performance indicators: leadership, programming, communication, and collaboration.


Alumni Leader Toolkit

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Club and Organization Fundamentals

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  • Regional clubs should collaborate with affinity groups such as the Chicago Booth Women’s Network or the Chicago Booth Black Alumni Association
  • Your organization board can help current students who end up in your region organize treks and mixers with alumni who might connect them to top employers 
  • Research centers might be visiting your city with a purpose, and they can make helpful introductions and collaborate on relevant events, where possible.  
  • Share your successes and best practices with other Chicago Booth alumni leaders around the globe.

Resources:

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Leadership Development & Board Management

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  • Each club should have a board consisting of at least 2 members
  • We recommend a two-year term limit for leaders 
  • We recommend four board meetings per year

Resources

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Event Planning

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  • At least 2 events per year (programming should be scaled to market size)
  • Events can be community based, social  or provide intellectual content
  • Your club board will choose the type of event, speakers, and a venue

Resources

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Marketing & Communications

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  • Your club will have its own website hosted by Booth with some customizable content 
  • Your events will be promoted in a weekly newsletter to local alumni 
  • Custom emails and surveys may be requested but used sparingly 
  • Your club owns and operates your own social media groups  

Resources:

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Policies & Guidelines

Commonly Asked Questions

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Do we charge for alumni events?

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  • Typically, yes. We charge a nominal registration fee to cover costs of food & beverage and any other associated costs. This fee varies event to event.
  • At Chicago Booth, you do not need to be a due-paying member of the alumni association to attend events, so the registration fees help subsidize the alumni gatherings.

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How many people should we expect to attend an event?

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  • You should expect between 1-10% turnout of total number of alumni in your market
  • Even an event with 5 to 10 people can be successful with the right curation (you set capacity).
  • Alumni relations does not consider the number of alumni to be a success factor in alumni events

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How can we find venues?

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  • Cafes, bars and restaurants work well for mixers and social events
  • For speaker events and panel discussions, try to find corporate hosts (typically where the speaker works) through alumni connections or co-working spaces.

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How to organize a panel or speaker event?

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  • Use your board to brainstorm ideas on relevant and timely topics
  • Evaluate your alumni base to recognize top employers and possible thought leadership
  • Have a plan for written outreach (detailed, precise, and considerate)
  • Have a long list of potential speakers, as you can

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How do we prepare a moderator?

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  • The best moderators know the speaker they are interviewing. Try to choose a moderator that is a colleague, friend, or classmate; as there is an inherit understanding the speaker’s expertise.
  • If the moderator is not a friend of the speaker, then prepare your moderator with a list of questions and topics he or she might cover. Suggest that the moderator and speaker set up a phone call to practice a dry run before the event.