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Booth in the News; Autumn 2012, Vol. 1

(Covering June 1 to September 25, 2012)

Here are highlights of the latest Chicago Booth news coverage. The digest below represents only a portion of recent coverage.

Section 1: News coverage of Booth

  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Booth was featured in an article headlined "Schools Tout Free Courses to Lure Alumni Back." Booth allows alumni to take up to three free classes, but unlike some other schools Booth adds grades to alumni transcripts. "Faculty want engaged participants," said Stacey Kole, deputy dean of the Full-Time MBA program. Since 2005, at least 200 graduates have taken more than 500 free courses, Deputy Dean Kole said in the article published September 6. 
    Read article
  • FINANCIAL TIMES. Booth's Social New Venture Challenge was featured in an article headlined "Business plan winners hope to shine a light on social enterprise," published September 10. LuminAID, a company that makes solar-powered lanterns, won $30,000 in cash in Booth's social business plan competition in May, the article noted. "It has been extremely challenging but also an exciting time," said Andrea Sreshta, MBA '13, co-founder of LuminAID. "It really is a great product," said Deputy Dean Robert Gertner. "It has a social purpose, but you could see this kind of product prominently displayed in a camping store, or on an e-commerce site for gadget lovers." 
    Read article
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. The quarterly Chicago Booth/Kellogg School Financial Trust Index made news July 24 in an article headlined "Trust in Financial System Falls Back to 2009 Levels." Just 21% of Americans trust the financial system, the results show. "This suggests that the national banks may be 'too big to trust,'" said Professor Luigi Zingales, co-author of the index. 
    Read article
  • BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK. Booth, Harvard and Wharton experienced a much smaller drop in applications this year than schools that are more reliant on Wall Street jobs, according to an article published August 30. Applications for the entering class at Columbia and NYU dropped 19 percent and 12 percent, respectively, while there was only a slight decline at Booth, Harvard and Wharton, the article said. 
    Read article
  • FORBES. The Summer Accelerator Program at Booth's Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship was featured in an article headlined "University Summer Startup Accelerators Come To A Close," published September 4. At Booth, the program offers separate office space to each of ten companies. "The team at Polsky sat with each company on an ongoing basis to provide recommendations and connections to the school's broad network," the article said. "Something as simple as offering space and stipends is a huge step in supporting University entrepreneurs." 
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  • THE NEW YORK TIMES. Gleacher Center was featured in an article headlined "Corporate Events, on Campus," published September 18. Gleacher Conference Center makes sense for corporate meetings, said Colin Greene, senior director of the Center. "There are no tourists in the lobby or guests in swimsuits," he said. 
    Read article
  • POETS AND QUANTS.COM. Booth's hiring of former Financial Times reporter Hal Weitzman to the newly-created position of executive director of intellectual capital was covered in an article posted September 19. The hiring "reflects an attempt by the school to more aggressively tout the work of its prestigious faculty, long a powerful force at the business school," the article said. 
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  • The Chicago Tribune also ran an article about Weitzman's appointment 
    Read article
  • U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT. A survey of economic experts conducted by Booth's Initiative on Global Markets was the focus of an article headlined "Economists Agree: Tax Cuts Cost Revenue," June 29. "First, let's be clear that we're not talking about a biased group of economists," the article said. "The IGM economics experts panel ... was created to explore the extent to which economists agree or disagree on major public policy issues, and it includes Democrats, Republicans, and independents, as well as older and younger scholars." 
    Read article
  • A similar article ran in The Atlantic June 28. 
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  • BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK. Booth's career services were featured in an article containing interview tips. Before going into an interview "you need to know the requirements of the role very well and be able to speak to those requirements," said Char Bennington, director of career management. Another big mistake: trying to wing it when asked common interview questions. Answers to these questions should be formulated, and practiced, in advance, the article said. "Some schools, including Booth, make questions available to students for just this reason," the August 21 article said.
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  • EXIBART.COM. This Italian website about art published an article about Booth's art collection at Harper Center. The display of contemporary art at Booth should be regarded as an example for Italian business schools such as Bocconi and others to duplicate, the article said. Professor Canice Prendergast was quoted throughout the article, published August 31. 
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  • TOPMBA.COM. Clinical Professor Michael Gibbs published an article about Booth headlined "Producing ideas and leaders that shape the world of business," September 19. "The depth and breadth of international experience, networks and sophistication in one of our classrooms is astonishing," he wrote, referring to the executive MBA program. Professor Gibbs is faculty director of the EMBA. 
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  • MARKETING NEWS. Booth's New Venture Challenge was featured in an article about Chicago's growth as a center for entrepreneurship. The business plan competition has launched more than 75 companies, said Clinical Professor Ellen Rudnick, executive director of the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship. Past winners include successes such as GrubHub Inc., the July 17 article noted. 
    Read article
  • POETS AND QUANTS.COM. Booth's application deadlines and essay questions for next year's entering class were included in an article headlined "Booth Makes PowerPoint Optional," posted July 10. Applicants can forgo the four-slide presentation in favor of an additional essay with a 600-word limit, the article said. 
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  • This website about business schools posted an article about Kurt Ahlm, Booth's associate dean for student recruitment and admissions, headlined "The Gatekeeper to Chicago Booth." 
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Section 2: News coverage of Booth faculty.

  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Professor John Cochrane wrote an op-ed headlined "The Federal Reserve: From Central Bank to Central Planner," published September 1. "The Fed's 'nontraditional' actions have crossed a bright line into fiscal policy and the direct allocation of credit," he wrote. 
    Read article
  • THE NEW YORK TIMES. Professor Richard Thaler wrote an Economic View column headlined "A Chance to Make Mortgage Shopping Easier," August 18. The new Consumer Finance Protection Bureau should give borrowers the option of receiving mortgage disclosure documents in a machine-readable version, he wrote. This means "the information would be stored in a way that allows easy processing by computers," Professor Thaler said. "With a machine-readable version, a mortgage shopper could then upload the information to any number of Web sites or applications that would serve as intelligent 'choice engines.'" 
    Read article
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Professor Austan Goolsbee wrote an op-ed titled "Mitt Romney's Tax Plan and the Middle Class," August 21. "There's no way the GOP candidate can avoid increasing the deficit without adding to the burden on middle-income earnings," he wrote. Regardless of who wins in November, "they will need to have a balanced plan that shares sacrifice among us all ... The Bowles-Simpson plan was designed to facilities such a deal. Mr. Romney's plan was designed to wreck it," Professor Goolsbee wrote. 
    Read article
  • THE NEW YORK TIMES. Professor John Cochrane wrote a commentary titled "Inflation Should Be Feared," posted online August 21 on the Room for Debate page. "While preventing deflation in the recession was vital, the idea that a deliberate inflation is the key out of our policy-induced doldrums makes no sense," he wrote. 
    Read article
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Professor John Cochrane wrote an op-ed titled "Myths and Facts About the Gold Standard," July 27. "While many people believe the United States should adopt a gold standard to guard against inflation or deflation, and stabilize the economy, there are several reasons why this reform would not work," he wrote. "However, there is a modern adaptation of the gold standard that could achieve a stable price level and avoid the many disruptions brought upon the economy by monetary instability." 
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  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Professor Austan Goolsbee wrote an op-ed titled "The Supreme Court Rules, Markets Yawn," published July 4. "Of all the public reactions to last Thursday’s surprise ruling from the Supreme Court on the Affordable Care Act, one of the most interesting came from the markets: Nothing happened," he wrote. "That probably disappointed those who spent the past two years saying that the costs from increased regulation and fear of the health plan explain why U.S. companies have not hired faster and have accumulated huge amounts of cash on their balance sheets." 
    Read article
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Professor Luigi Zingales wrote an op-ed titled "Crony Capitalism and the Crisis of the West," published June 6. "In Italy and Greece, the most talented don't get ahead," he wrote. "That's also increasingly true in the United States." 
    Read article
  • THE NEW YORK TIMES. Professor Richard Thaler wrote the Economic View column headlined "Watching Behavior Before Writing the Rules," July 7. He discussed his activities as an unpaid academic adviser to the British government's Behavioral Insights Team. "I have found myself proposing two guidelines so often that they have come to be known as team mantras," he wrote. First, "If you want to encourage some activity, make it easy," and second, "You can't make evidence-based policy decisions without evidence." 
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  • THE NEW YORK TIMES. Professor Anil Kashyap wrote an op-ed titled "To Save the Euro, Leave It," June 26. Instead of having European Union leaders talk about centralizing banking regulation and putting limits on national spending and borrowing, "a better, bolder and, until now, almost inconceivable solution is for Germany to reintroduce the mark, which would cause the euro to immediately decline in value," he wrote. "Such a devaluation would give troubled economies, especially those of Greece, Italy and Spain, the financial flexibility they need to stabilize themselves." The op-ed was co-written with Kenneth Griffin, founder and CEO of Citadel, an investment company. 
    Read article
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Professor Anil Kashyap wrote an op-ed titled "A Plan to Revive Japan," published September 10. "Tokyo can spur growth if it cuts red tape, frees trade and consolidates fiscal policy," he wrote. "But it needs the will." 
    Read article

    BLOOMBERG NEWS. Professor John Cochrane wrote an op-ed titled "CBO Demands a Leap of Faith on the Fiscal Cliff," published September 3. "Last month, the Congressional Budget Office released a report warning that the 'fiscal cliff' would cause a new recession," he wrote. "It came to the right conclusion for all the wrong reasons." 
    Read article
  • THE NEW YORK TIMES. Professor Luigi Zingales wrote an op-ed titled "The College Graduate as Collateral," June 13. "We criticize predatory loans by mortgage brokers, when student loans can be just as abusive," he wrote. "To avoid the next credit bubble and debt crisis, we need to eliminate government subsidies and link tuition financing to the incomes of college graduates ... Investors could finance students' education with equity rather than debt. In exchange for their capital, the investors would receive a fraction of a student's future income - or, even better, a fraction of the increase in her income that derives from college attendance." 
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  • LOS ANGELES TIMES. Professor Luigi Zingales wrote an op-ed titled "The Angry Americans: The Occupy movement and the 'tea party' have some common targets." Those targets include bankers and Washington politicians. He proposed several steps to achieve "meaningful reform." The first step would be an elimination of all tax deductions and loopholes. The second step would be to require that new regulations be so simple that even members of Congress could understand them "because cronyism thrives in opacity and complexity." The op-ed was published July 5. 
    Read article
  • THE GUARDIAN (London). Professor Raghu Rajan wrote an op-ed titled "Dealing with the legitimacy of money's distribution," August 7. "Because money's anonymity obscures its provenance, it may be socially less acceptable as a payment medium for some objects," he wrote. 
    Read article
  • BLOOMBERG NEWS. Professor Luigi Zingales wrote an op-ed titled "We Would Be Better Off Had Romney Been President," published September 23. "Heading into November's election, voters should be asking which president would have done a better job with the cards Obama was dealt," he wrote. "Although such hypothetical questions are hard to answer, a quick look at the record suggests the winner would be Romney." 
    Read article
  • BLOOMBERG NEWS. Professor John Cochrane wrote an op-ed titled "Forget About the Mandate. Let's Fix Health Care," published July 12. "Where are the health-care equivalents of Southwest Airlines Co., Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Apple Inc. - innovating, dramatically lowering costs and bringing everyday low prices to health care?" he wrote. "They have been kept out of the market by anti-competitive regulation." 
    Read article
  • REUTERS. Professor Raghuram Rajan wrote an op-ed titled "Is inequality inhibiting growth," July 11. "Two facts stand out," he wrote. "First, overall demand for goods and services is much weaker, both in Europe and the United States, than it was in the go-go years before the recession. Second, most of the economic gains in the U.S. in recent years have gone to the rich, while the middle class has fallen behind in relative terms." 
    Read article
  • FINANCIAL TIMES. Professor Luigi Zingales wrote an op-ed titled "Why I was won over by Glass-Steagall," published June 10. "To function properly markets need a large number of independent traders," he wrote. "The separation between commercial and investment banking deprived investment banks of access to cheap funds (in the form of deposits), forcing them to limit their size and the size of their bets. These limitations increased the number of market participants, making markets more liquid." 
    Read article
  • BLOOMBERG NEWS. Professor Amir Sufi wrote an op-ed titled "Seizures May Be Cities' Last Hope in Mortgage Crisis," July 18. "The failure to address crippling household-debt burdens is leading local governments to embrace the radical idea of using eminent domain to seize and write down mortgages," he wrote. 
    Read article
  • MINT (India). Professor Raghuram Rajan wrote an op-ed titled "What happened to India?" published June 10. "For a nation as poor as India, growth should be what Americans call a 'no-brainer,'" he wrote. "Then why is it underperforming relative to its potential?" 
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Professor Austan Goolsbee wrote an op-ed titled "A Fiscal Union Won't Fix the Euro Crisis," May 29. "The only practical choices are more geographic mobility, inflation, or subsidies," he wrote. 
    Read article
  • BLOOMBERG NEWS. Professor Luigi Zingales wrote an op-ed titled "Do Business Schools Incubate Criminals?" July 16. "We are dealing with a drop in ethical standards throughout the business world, and our graduate schools are partly to blame," he wrote. "Most business schools do offer ethics classes. Yet these classes are generally divided into two categories. Some simply illustrate ethical dilemmas without taking a position on how people are expected to act. Others hide behind the concept of corporate social responsibility, suggesting that social obligations rest on firms, not on individuals." 
    Read article
  • BLOOMBERG NEWS. Professor Nicholas Polson wrote an op-ed titled "Are You With the Dumb Money or the Smart Money," June 13. "Market observers often divide investors into 'smart money' and 'dumb money,'" he wrote. "Our research shows there may be a way to figure out which group you are in." 
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  • BLOOMBERG NEWS. Professor Luigi Zingales wrote an op-ed titled "Banking Union Is Last Gambit to Save Euro Dream," July 29. "As the impending default of the Spanish regions amply demonstrates, a fiscal union without a transfer of political powers to a central authority is pure folly," he wrote. 
    Read article
  • BLOOMBERG NEWS. Clinical Professor Brian Barry wrote an op-ed titled "Romney Shouldn't Avoid the Income-Inequality Debate," published June 27. "The reason isn't just that the country's widening income gap over the past few decades is an issue any president should address," he wrote. "Romney should also talk about inequality because he could benefit in the November election by convincing voters that there is more than one way to increase incomes for low-earning households." 
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  • NEW YORK DAILY NEWS. Professor Luigi Zingales wrote an op-ed titled "A better way to tax corporations," published June 12. "Republicans should like this solution, because it simplifies the tax code and reduces marginal tax rates on corporate income," he wrote. "Democrats should like it because it reduces the tax burden on lower-income investors." 
    Read article
  • BLOOMBERG NEWS. Professor Anil Kashyap wrote an op-ed titled "How Japan Can Avert Nuclear Disaster," published June 7. "The owner of a (nuclear) plant could be required to work with the regulator to come up with a credible evacuation plan for the residents within an 80-kilometer radius of the installation," he wrote. "The plan should aim for a complete evacuation within 24 hours; if this cannot be achieved, the barriers to its implementation should be identified and a strategy for addressing them announced." 
    Read article
  • THE ECONOMIST. Research by Deputy Dean Steven Davis was featured in an article headlined "Dithering in the dark: Quantifying the effect of political uncertainty on the global economy," published June 16. Professor Davis and his co-authors have constructed an index that counts how often uncertainty related to policy is mentioned in newspapers, the number of temporary provisions in the tax code and the degree to which forecasts of inflation and federal spending differ from each other, the article said. That index hit its highest in 25 years during the summer 2011 debt-ceiling battle and remains high. 
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  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Research by Associate Professor Amit Seru was featured in an article headlined "Paper: Why Obama's Loan Modification Program Fell Short," published September 5. Professor Seru and his co-authors found that President Obama's 2009 loan-modification push fell short of its goals in part because large banks weren’t able to respond quickly enough. 
    Read article
  • Bloomberg Businessweek also published an article about Professor Seru's research. 
    Read article
  • The research was also featured on the website of CBS News. 
    Read article
  • THE NEW YORK TIMES. Professor Randall Kroszner was quoted in an article headlined "Economic Stimulus as the Election Nears? It's Been Done Before," published September 11. The Federal Reserve is poised to announce that will seek to stimulate the economy in the middle of a presidential election season, the article said. "Any decision the Fed will make will make someone unhappy, but what you want out of an independent agency is a careful deliberative process," said Professor Kroszner, a Fed governor from 2006 to 2009. 
    Read article
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Professor Austan Goolsbee said the Federal Reserve's decision to purchase more mortgage securities and hold interest rates steady into 2015 won't dramatically increase the growth rate but it puts us "moving in the right direction." He made his comments during an on-camera interview shown on wsj.com September 13. 
    Watch video
  • BLOOMBERG TELEVISION. Professor John Cochrane discussed government stimulus versus austerity measures during an interview broadcast August 16. He also talked about U.S. tax policy and regulation. 
    Read article
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Professor Anil Kashyap was quoted in an article headlined "Central Bankers' Political Conundrum," published September 14. Referring to Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke, Professor Kashyap said "The only way history treats him badly is if they don't exit (the current low interest rate environment) soon enough. The risk for the Fed is that politicians are going to make this so unpleasant for them that when the time comes to raise rates they'll have to do it sooner than they'd like to show they have the will to do it." 
    Read article
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Deputy Dean Steven Davis and Professor Steven Kaplan were quoted in an article headlined "Tally of Job Creation By Bain Proves Vexing," July 11. Professor Kaplan estimated the Bain Capital created "tens of thousands" of jobs while Mitt Romney was at the firm, the article said. "There's no way to settle the argument" about apportioning credit for investments made more than two decades ago, Deputy Dean Davis said. "Bain Capital probably had something to do with the early success of Staples but there were a lot of things that happened along the way that helped Staples grow and Bain had nothing to do with." 
    Read article
  • THE ECONOMIST. Professor Luigi Zingales was featured in a Q&A interview headlined "When business and government are bedfellows," published August 23. "There is not a well-understood distinction between being pro-business and being pro-market," he said. "Businessmen like free markets until they get into a market; once they are in it they want to block entry to others. Pro-marketeers want free markets all the time." 
    Read article
  • FINANCIAL TIMES. The latest book by Professor Luigi Zingales, "A Capitalism for the People: Recapturing the Lost Genius of American Prosperity," was included on a list of the best business books of 2012, published August 9. 
    Read article
  • THE NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT. Professor Randall Kroszner discussed the Federal Reserve Board's third round of quantitative easing during an interview broadcast September 13. "It's a little big unclear how much help this can be going forward," Professor Kroszner said. 
    Watch video
  • THE ECONOMIST. Research by Professor Steven Kaplan was featured in the popular Schumpeter column headlined "Bargain bosses: American chief executives are not overpaid," published September 8. Professor Kaplan's argument that most CEOs are paid fairly is "well-grounded and intricate," the magazine said. "It is now impossible to talk sensibly about this subject without first grappling with Mr. Kaplan." 
    Read article
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Research by Professor John Cochrane was cited in an editorial titled "Romney's Pre-Existing Politics," published September 11. 
    Read article
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Research by Associate Professor Adair Morse and Assistant Professor Margarita Tsoutsoura on tax evasion in Greece was published July 9. Using data from one of Greece’s largest banks, their conservative estimate is that some 28 billion euros in income went unreported in 2009, the article said. Taxed at 40 percent, that equates to 11.2 billion euros – nearly a third of Greece’s budget deficit. 
    Read article
  • The New York Times also published an article about the research. 
    Read article
  • THE ECONOMIC TIMES (India). Deputy Dean Robert Gertner was featured in a Q&A headlined "Entrepreneurship blooms in downturn," published September 14. "slowing markets and growth can push people into entrepreneurship," he said. "... in the United States you see waves of venture capital financing and some levels of entrepreneurship are pretty good." Booth’s New Venture Challenge and Social New Venture Challenge were mentioned in the article. 
  • THE ECONOMIST. Research by Professor Amir Sufi was featured in an article headlined "The mystery of Jackson Hole; Central Bankers Wonder Why Success Eludes Them." Professor Sufi told a conference of central bankers in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, that raising banks' profits has not done much to restart demand because the real problem is that indebted households cannot or will not borrow. He presented evidence that retail spending and car sales have been weaker in states that entered the recession with higher household debt," the September 8 article said. 
    Read article
  • Professor Sufi’s Jackson Hole presentation was also covered by The Wall Street Journal. 
    Read article
  • THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD. Following his successful efforts advising the British government's Behavioral Insights Team, Professor Richard Thaler is now advising the Australian government on the similar strategies, according to an article published September 21 headlined "Nudge, nudge, think, think: pay your debts or else." Professor Thaler is author of the best-seller, "Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness." He has no plans to go to Australia in his advisory capacity with the government, he said. 
    Read article
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Professor Douglas Skinner was featured in an article about earnings guidance issued by companies. Negative preannouncements can portend a particularly volatile period for stocks, meaning investors might think about lightening their stock allocations if they will need the money within the next couple of years, Professor Skinner said June 29. The article noted that he has researched company preannouncements. 
    Read article
  • CRAIN’S CHICAGO BUSINESS. Professor Raghuram Rajan has been named chief economic adviser to India's government, according to an article published August 30. He will restructure his academic commitments and remain on the Booth faculty while meeting his responsibilities in India. "The post-crisis world has been challenging for all countries, and India is no exception," Professor Rajan said in a separate announcement from Booth. "And I am pleased that I will be able to reorganize my duties at Booth to allow me to undertake these new responsibilities." Professor Rajan’s experiences in India will, "no doubt be invaluable for our students," Dean Kumar said. 
    Read article 
    Read Booth announcement
  • The Chicago Tribune also ran a story about Professor Rajan. 
    Read article
  • THE WASHINGTON POST. Professor Amir Sufi was described as an economist who "has done groundbreaking research on the role of debt in the economy," in an article published September 1. "The policy bias has been toward supporting financial institutions as opposed to targeting what I think is the central problem. And that is the household debt problem," Professor Sufi said at a conference in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, hosted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. 
  • CHICAGO TRIBUNE. Professor Randall Kroszner was quoted in an article headlined "Fed's latest move no guarantee of success," published September 14. The third round of quantitative easing by the Federal Reserve Board gives business owners and executives confidence that they can count on help from the Fed for a long time, he said. Professor Kroszner also noted that the Fed provided unusual assurances that it would continue to keep interest rates low – even after the recovery has begun. 
    Read article
  • CNN.COM. Professors Erik Hurt, Raghuram Rajan, and Amir Sufi, and Assistant Professor Matthew Notowidigdo were cited in an article headlined "U.S. economy weakened years before the crash," published July 23. "A number of economists, many of them based at the University of Chicago, have been devising new ways to test these theories to determine what has really happened to cause high unemployment," the article said. 
    Read article
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Deputy Dean Steven Davis was quoted in an article headlined "U.S. economic recovery is weakest since World War II," published August 15. Never in the postwar period has there been so much uncertainty about what policymakers will do, Professor Davis said. "No one is sure what will actually happen." 
  • NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO. Deputy Dean Robert Gertner was featured in an article about Panera Café's "Pay What You Want" concept in Chicago. It's very rare for a company to have its charitable activities as a nonprofit version of what they do, Professor Gertner said. "I think it's something of a challenge to make it work." The interview was broadcast September 7 on All Things Considered. 
    Listen to broadcast
  • CHICAGO TRIBUNE. Research by Professor Austan Goolsbee was featured in an article headlined "Chicago cutting jobless rate faster than other big cities," published July 18. While Chicago has the third-highest unemployment rate among the 10 largest cities, at 9.8 percent, that rate is down 1.7 percentage points from a year earlier – a strong rate of recovery, Professor Goolsbee’s research showed. "I think the mayor gets a credit for an assist, but most of the credit goes to the private sector," he said. 
    Read article
  • A 12-minute interview with Professor Goolsbee was broadcast July 18 on WTTW-TV, Chicago. 
    Watch video
  • BLOOMBERG TV. Professor John Cochrane discussed the bond-buying proposal from Mario Draghi, president of the European Central Bank, and global central bank policy during an interview broadcast September 5. 
    Watch video
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Research by Deputy Dean Steven Davis was cited in an op-ed titled "The Romney Plan for Economic Recovery," written by Glenn Hubbard, an economic advisor to Gov. Romney. Professor Davis found that uncertainty over policy reduced GDP by 1.4% in 2011, and that returning to pre-crisis levels of uncertainty would add about 2.3 million jobs in 18 months, the op-ed said. 
    Read article
     
  • FOX NEWS. Deputy Dean Steven Davis said the U.S. economy is experiencing a "Rocky Balboa recovery," during an interview broadcast August 17. Each time the recovery starts to take hold, it gets knocked down, he said. 
    Watch video
  • FOX NEWS. Professor Austan Goolsbee discussed what it would take to increase the number of jobs available in the U.S. during an interview broadcast September 9. 
    Watch video
  • NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO. Professor Randall Kroszner discussed possible new action by the Federal Reserve Board during an interview broadcast August 31. "I think the chairman is willing (to take action) but he wants to see a little bit more data before he makes a decision," said Professor Kroszner, who was a Fed governor from 2006 to 2009. The interview aired on All Things Considered. 
    Listen to broadcast
  • XINHUA NEWS (China). Professor Randall Kroszner said the Federal Reserve Board is "very close to doing some more quantitative easing," in an article published September 13. Later that same day the Fed announced that it would buy large quantities of mortgage bonds. 
    Read article
  • DIE WELT (Germany). Professor Anil Kashyap was quoted in an article about the independence of central banks headlined "Farewell to the old ideal," published September 24. "Among economics, there is broad agreement that independent central banks are performing better than politically controlled ones," Professor Kashyap said. 
    Read article in German
  • CHOSUN ILBO (South Korea). Professor Randall Kroszner was featured in an article headlined "Fed unlikely to announce more stimulus at Jackson Hole meeting," published August 30. His photo accompanied the article. 
    Read article in Korean
  • BARRON'S. Research by Professor Tobias Moskowitz was featured in an article headlined "Go With the Big Mo: Contrary to popular perception, momentum strategies remind effective. The key is to apply them during nonturbulent periods," published July 6. The implication of the new research is that the current environment is a relatively safe one in which to pursue momentum strategies, the article said. 
    Read article
  • CNBC. Professor Austan Goolsbee and Sen. Jim DeMint discussed the effects of taxes on jobs during a joint appearance on The Kudlow Report July 10. "If you look at the top 400 earners in the country, the tax rate that they paid as a share of their income has been cut in half over the last 14 years," Professor Goolsbee said. "So there is no evidence that cutting high income people's taxes by trillions of dollars, as Mitt Romney is proposing, leads to significant job creation." 
    Watch video
  • THE WASHINGTON POST. Research by Associate Professor Brent Neiman and Assistant Professor Loukas Karabarbounis was featured in an article headlined "Corporations are saving more and paying less," published July 27. The research shows that corporations are saving more of their income, and paying less of it out in wages, the article said. 
    Read article
  • FINANCIAL TIMES. Research by Associate Professor Jane Risen was featured in the "Something for the weekend"" column July 20. She found that while waiting for an outcome that was out of their control, individuals often are compelled to do good deeds, with the implicit expectations that the universe would return the favor. Professor Risen described the phenomenon as "investing in karma." The research was conducted with Travis Carter, a post-doctoral research associate at Booth and with a faculty member at the University of Virginia. 
    Read article
  • An article about the research also appeared in Times Higher Education. 
    Read article
  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Research by Professor Christopher Hsee on money and happiness was featured in the Week in Ideas column September 19. He used a lab simulation of real life called the Retirement Game, in which people must make decisions about how much to work, for what rewards, and when to quit, the article said. In the game, the more people earned, the less happy they were. 
    Read article
  • The Huffington Post also published an article about Professor Hsee's research. 
    Read article
  • BLOOMBERG NEWS. Professor Douglas Diamond was quoted in an article about industry efforts to block new regulations on the $2.6 trillion money-market fund industry. If opponents of the regulations prevail, the U.S. financial system will be more vulnerable to instability, Professor Diamond said in the article published August 21. "The industry is being shortsighted about risk," he added. 
    Read article
  • ECONOMIC TIMES OF INDIA. A summary of a speech in India by Professor Douglas Diamond was featured in an article headlined "Short-term debt can cause financial crises," published August 20. 
    Read article
  • NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO. Professor Luigi Zingales was one of the experts featured in a story about U.S. tax policy. "I don’t see a path to fiscal stability that does not include higher marginal tax rates," he said. The story was posted July 25. 
    Listen to broadcast
  • THE NEW YORK TIMES. Assistant Professor Wilhelm Hofmann was quoted in an article headlined "Turn Off the Phone (and the Tension)," published August 25. Heavy users of social media can adopt coping mechanisms - similar to training oneself to eat healthily, Professor Hofmann said. "It's a problem of self-control." He recommends setting up a screen diet, building in a period each day to go screenless. 
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  • CHICAGO TRIBUNE. Associate Professor Oleg Urminsky was quoted in an article headlined "Posting of calories not lowering count for most diners," published September 23. The calorie postings at restaurants may have the most impact on those who may need it least, he said. "Those are people who are already fairly heath conscious and understand how many calories a healthy lunch should have." 
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  • MARKETPLACE RADIO. Professor Luigi Zingales discussed his latest book, "A Capitalism for the People," during an interview broadcast August 16 on the Marketplace Morning Report. "In Italy, nepotism is dominant," he said. "It's more important who you know rather than what you know," he said, adding "I see signs that America is becoming more like Italy and I say that not in terms of wine and food but in terms of the political system and the economic system." 
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  • SLATE.COM. Research by Professor Erik Hurst and Assistant Professor Matthew Notowidigdo was featured in an article headlined "Unemployment: Manufacturing and construction jobs aren't coming back. Americans need new skills." In contrast to earlier recessions, when the economy temporarily performed below its long-run capacity, Professors Hurst and Notowidigdo say the 2008 recession was a necessary correction for an economy overheated and distorted by a credit-fueled housing bubble. The article was published July 16. 
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  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Professor Luigi Zingales' latest book was reviewed June 8 in an article headlined "A Cure for What Ails Us." In the book, "A Capitalism for the People: Recapturing the Lost Genius of American Prosperity," his policy prescriptions include having just three focused federal regulatory agencies, "not the chaos of competing bureaus that now confuse the situation," the article said. 
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  • The Economist also reviewed the book on July 14. 
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  • The New York Times discussed the book June 2. 
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  • BARRON'S. Professor Luigi Zingales' latest book (see item above) was included on a list of book "corporate chiefs and market mavens are taking to the beach," published July 14. Yale Professor Robert Shiller said "This remarkably creative book, driven by a strong moral conviction, offers a bold array of ideas so we can make the U.S. capitalist model work better for everyone." 
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  • CHICAGO TRIBUNE. Research by Deputy Dean Steven Davis was cited in an editorial titled "Romney and Bain, A business based on rigid efficiency makes a rich target," published June 16. "In a noteworthy research paper last year, the University of Chicago’s Steven Davis and four colleagues tested the popular idea that leveraged buyouts bring huge job losses," the editorial said. When job losses and job gains from LBOs are taken together, "the net job loss amounts to no more than 1 to 2 percent, depending on how you count post-buyout acquisitions and divestitures," the research found. 
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  • CNBC. Professor Randall Kroszner responded to calls for the Federal Reserve to be audited during an appearance on The Kudlow Report August 21. "The Fed is already audited by the big accounting firms, so their data is out in the public," he said. 
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  • THE AUSTRALIAN. Professor John Cochrane was quoted in an article headlined "Financial storm on the horizon," published September 15. "Government has become giant insurance operations with an army on the side," he said, adding that instead of their focus on building public infrastructure and maintaining public order, Western governments favor redistributing income. "Governments now function mainly to take from A to give to B." 
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  • ENTREPRENEUR MAGAZINE. Clinical Professor Waverly Deutsch was featured in an article headlined "9 Successful Entrepreneurs Moonlighting as Professors," published September 5. Professor Deutsch is an active angel investor and advisor to many companies, the article noted. 
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  • FINANCIAL TIMES. Research by Deputy Dean Steven Davis was cited in a commentary titled "The plague of economic uncertainty," published August 19. "The Romney campaign says that economic policy uncertainty has arisen because of doubts about President Obama's regulatory and tax policies, which have (they contend) depressed investment spending," the article said. "As evidence for this, they refer to an index of economic uncertainty which has been calculated by Nick Bloom, Steve Davis and Scott Baker." 
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  • NATIONAL JOURNAL. Research by Deputy Dean Steven Davis on economic policy uncertainty was cited in an article headlined "Romney's Economics Prizes Theory Over Data," published August 9. Professors John Cochrane and Amir Sufi were also quoted in the article. 
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  • KOREA TIMES. Professor Raghuram Rajan said the Korean government is making a mistake by its efforts to overprotect small- and medium-sized businesses at the expense of conglomerates, according to an article published June 13. "In a global economy, it's a very bad idea to keep successful domestic entities out of certain areas, because in the absence of competitive rivals, successful foreign entities will enter the areas," he said in Seoul at a business forum hosted by the Korea Trade-Investment Promotion Corporation. 
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  • PENSIONS & INVESTMENTS. Professor Steven Kaplan was featured in an article headlined "Reality trumps Occupy Wall Street's passion," published September 17. Reflective of the improvement in the alignment of management and shareholder interests, shareholders approved say-on-pay advisory votes on executive compensation by margins of 98 percent at companies in the S&P 500 and Russell 3000 indexes, Professor Kaplan said. 
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  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Research by Professor Erik Hurst was featured in an article headlined "Inequality Has Increased in Income and Consumption, Economists Argue; Inequality in U.S. incomes has been matched by disparities in consumption, according to recent economic research." Professor Hurst and his co-authors found that not only has consumption inequality increased, but that it has also increased alongside income inequality and that inaccurate consumption data has been at the core of the issue. The article was published June 8. 
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  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Deputy Dean Steven Davis was one of the experts cited in an article headlined "For Middle-Aged Job Seekers, a Long Road Back." Part of what set the most recent recession apart from the milder downturns of the 1990s and early 2000s, Professor Davis said, is that this recession didn't primarily strike young workers, or those with erratic work histories. It also hit productive, steady workers in the prime of their careers - people who are ordinarily the backbone of the economy. The article was published June 22. 
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  • THE NEW YORK TIMES. Research by Deputy Dean Robert Gertner was featured in an article headlined "For Arts Institutions, Thinking Big Can Be Suicidal," published June 27. The study examined the cultural building boom between 1994 and 2008, "when museums, performing arts centers and theaters in the U.S. got swept up in new construction or major renovations," the article said. Professor Gertner's research was conducted with the University of Chicago's Cultural Policy Center. 
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  • FOX BUSINESS NETWORK. Professor Randall Kroszner discussed the likelihood that the Federal Reserve might take action soon to boost the economy. "I think the employment report that will come out in about a week and a half or two weeks will be very important" in determining what the Fed will do, he said during an interview broadcast August 23. Professor Kroszner was a Fed governor from 2006 to 2009. 
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  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Research by Deputy Dean Steven Davis was featured in an item titled the Rocky Balboa Recovery. Professor Davis and his co-authors "compare the recovery to the Italian stallion, but say because policymakers act decisively when things get bad and dither when things get better, corporate and consumer demand stalls just as the recovery gets going." The article was published June 20. 
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  • THE WARSAW VOICE (Poland). Professor Anil Kashyap was featured in a Q&A titled "Fool's Gold?" published September 4. He explained why most economists don't support a return to the gold standard. "It's pretty well understood that the gold standard contributed to some of the problems of the Great Depression," Professor Kashyap said. 
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  • THE WASHINGTON POST. Professor Amir Sufi was cited in a column headlined "The best case against the Obama administration," published August 20. Professor Sufi "has done some of the most important, persuasive research showing that household debt was at the center of this crisis -- proving, for instance, that the recession began earlier, and lasted longer, in counties with high debt levels," the article said.
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  • ABC NEWS.COM. Research by Associate Professor Devin Pope was featured in an article headlined "The Walmart Effect on Home Prices: Economists Say Home Prices Have Increased Near Stores," published June 14. The presence of a Walmart led to led to the increase of housing prices by 2 to 3 percent on average for homes within 0.5 miles of the store, according to the research by Professor Pope and his coauthors. For homes located between 0.5 and 1 mile of the store, prices increased 1 to 2 percent. 
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  • CNN.COM. Professor Randall Kroszner was quoted in an article headlined "Election won't stop the Fed," published September 4. "The (Federal Reserve) chairman has done his darndest to make decisions based on his judgment for what is best for the economy," Professor Kroszner said. "That's the key consideration, and if an action needs to be taken in a politically sensitive time, I think he will take that action independent of the political situation." 
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  • THE ATLANTIC. Clinical Professor Ellen Rudnick was quoted in an article reporting that "even in a sluggish economy, entrepreneurship is thriving." There are several reasons for the rise in startups, Professor Rudnick said. The sluggish economy played a part, because even as companies laid off employees, they outsourced parts of their business, giving former employees the opportunity to become self-employed contractors. Matt Maloney, MBA '10, co-founder of GrubHub, was also featured in the article published August 17. 
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  • FOX BUSINESS TELEVISION. Professor Randall Kroszner discussed how the decline in household income will impact the 2012 presidential election. The interview was broadcast September 27. 
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  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Research by Assistant Professor Kelly Shue was featured in an article headlined "How CEOs Make Friends, Get Influenced," published August 6. Professor Shue studied a group of Harvard Business School graduates and found that peer influence among CEOs and CFOs has a profound effect. For example, she found that executives show a greater tendency to acquire companies if their classmates have made acquisitions. 
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  • PENSIONS & INVESTMENTS. Assistant Professor Bryan Kelly won the inaugural AQR Capital Management Insight Award for his research in predicting marketing returns more accurately over one-month and one-year time horizons, according to an article published June 11. Professor Kelly shared the $100,000 prize with his co-author, Seth Pruitt, an economist at the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, the article said. 
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  • BLOOMBERG NEWS. Professor Steven Kaplan was quoted in an article about the challenges facing Bain Capital Partners as it seeks to raise $6 billion for a new fund in light of President Obama's criticism of Bain as an outsourcer and corporate raider. "There may be some political pushback in some places and they either won’t commit or wait until after the election," he said. "For corporations, sovereign-wealth funds and endowments, all of that is less of an issue." The article was published July 16. 
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  • THE NEW YORK TIMES. Research by Deputy Dean Steven Davis was featured in an article headlined "Fear of Year-End Fiscal Stalemate May Be Having Effect Now," published July 11. An economic policy uncertainty index he developed with two colleagues rose 56 percent between the start of April, when the so-called fiscal cliff began to draw headlines, and the start of July, the article said. The fiscal cliff refers to a combination of tax increases and spending cuts scheduled to start at the beginning of next year. 
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  • THE NEW YORK TIMES. Professor Jean-Pierre Dube was quoted in an article about poor Wi-Fi service on Amtrak. "They oversold the service, and now customers feel like they are not getting what they were promised," he said in the May 30 article. 
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  • CNN. Professor Austan Goolsbee said economic problems in Europe were one reason why only 80,000 jobs were added in the U.S. during June. The numbers reflect the slowing growth of the American economy, he said during an interview broadcast July 6. 
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  • CNBC. Professor Randall Kroszner was a guest on The Wall Street Journal Report with Maria Bartiromo August 12. Although the July employment report was a little better than expected, the U.S. economy is "barely" adding enough new jobs to keep the unemployment rate stable, Professor Kroszner said. Uncertainty about taxes and government spending, and problems in Europe are the main reasons why the jobs market remains weak, he added. 
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  • CNN. Professor Raghuram Rajan discussed what’s need to spur economic growth during an interview broadcast July 10. "How do we generate sustainable growth?" he asked. "For that you have to have real jobs with real incomes. Not fake jobs created by debt," he said. 
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  • CNBC ASIA. Deputy Dean Steven Davis discussed macroeconomic policy driving market volatility during an interview broadcast May 14 from Singapore. 
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  • In a separate interview on CNBC Asia, Professor Davis talked about the eurozone crisis. 
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  • WTTW-TV (Chicago). Professor Luigi Zingales discussed his book "A Capitalism for the People," during a 10-minute interview on the Chicago Tonight program June 18. 
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  • REUTERS. Research by Professor Lubos Pastor was featured in an article headlined "Is buy and hold dying a quick death?" published June 29. Professor Pastor and a co-author examined 206 years of stock returns and confronted the conventional wisdom that stock risk declines over time. "We find that stocks are actually more volatile from an investor's perspective," they concluded. 
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  • Professor Pastor discussed his findings during an interview on FOX Business June 27. 
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  • The New York Post also published an article about Professor Pastor's research on June 19. 
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  • BLOOMBERG TELEVISION. Professor Randall Kroszner said the June jobs report is a perfect example of the "sideways slide" he has been talking about for the past six months. Professor Kroszner made his comments during a July 6 interview. 
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  • FOX BUSINESS NETWORK. Professor Austan Goolsbee discussed whether we can expect diminishing returns from the third round of quantitative easing by the Federal Reserve September 13. The interview was broadcast the same day as the Fed's announcement. 
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  • FINANCIAL TIMES. Deputy Dean Steven Davis was quoted in an article headlined "Bain attacks on Romney miss target," published May 25. "I'm concerned these attacks will translate into policies that retard the creative (job) destruction process," he said. "If that slows down, it will help slow down productivity growth." 
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  • FOX BUSINESS TELEVISION. Professor Randall Kroszner said he believes the Federal Reserve "will be hesitant to take any action" at its August 1 meeting. Professor Kroszner, a Fed governor from 2006 to 2009, made his comments during an interview broadcast July 31. 
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  • CNN.COM. Professors Raghuram Rajan and Amir Sufi were mentioned in an article headlined "U.S. economy weakened years before the crash," posted July 23. "A number of economists, many of them based at the University of Chicago, have been devising new ways to test theories to determine what has really happened to cause high unemployment," the article said. 
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  • THE FISCAL TIMES. Deputy Dean Steven Davis was featured in a Q&A interview headlined "How Uncertainty Affects the Economy," published June 6. "There is fairly strong evidence that high levels of policy uncertainty foreshadow or precede deteriorations in macroeconomic performance as measured by things like employment growth, business investment, business hiring, and those types of things," Professor Davis said. 
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  • CHICAGO TRIBUNE. Professor John Cochrane was quoted in a column headlined "Sleaze factors into investment decisions," claiming Libor, JPMorgan and Peregrine incidents are making investors nervous and potentially depriving the economy of investment needed for growth. When frightened people buy U.S. government bonds rather than corporate bonds or stocks, "that limits how much companies can expand," Professor Cochrane said. The column was published July 18. 
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  • BLOOMBERG TV. Professor John Cochrane said a Greek exit from the euro would be worse than a default. He made his comments during an interview broadcast June 18. 
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  • THE ATLANTIC. Research by Professor Erik Hurst on leisure was featured in an article headlined "How the 2 Americas Spend Their Time," published July 12. The article summarizes his findings on the changing nature of work, gender, home life, and class in America. 
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  • CNN. Professor Raghuram Rajan discussed long-term strategies for U.S. economic stability during an interview broadcast July 8. 
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  • BBC RADIO. Professor Luigi Zingales offered remedies for "capitalism’s malaise," during an appearance on Business Daily, July 6. 
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  • THE WASHINGTON POST. Research by Associate Professor Devin Pope was featured in an article headlined "Weird weather turns us into irrational shoppers," July 9. He and his co-authors found that people are far more likely to buy SUVs with four-wheel drive when it’s snowing, or overvalue homes with swimming pools when the sun is scorching – and often end up lamenting the purchase, the article said. The findings are the result of "projection bias," which makes us think the future will resemble the present more closely that it actually does. 
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  • CHICAGO MAGAZINE. Research by Professor Amir Sufi was featured in an article headlined "Did the Financial Crisis Make Partisan Gridlock Inevitable?" published August 21. The research found that "banking, currency, inflation, or debt crises lead to greater ideological polarization in society, greater fractionalization of the legislative body, and a decrease in the size of the working majority of the ruling collation," the magazine reported. 
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  • THE NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT (Public Television). Professor Randall Kroszner discussed the latest action by the Federal Reserve Board during an interview broadcast June 20. He said he supported the Fed’s decision to extend Operation Twist, a program to sell short-term securities and buy long-term securities in an effort to bring down long-term interest rates. Professor Kroszner also agreed with the Fed’s decision to leave open the possibility to do more if conditions warrant it. 
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  • FM 90.5, BUSAN, SOUTH KOREA. Professor John Cochrane discussed financial conditions in Greece during an interview broadcast June 21.
  • ESPN.COM. Research by Associate Professor Devin Pope was featured in an article headlined "Hoops success helps enrollment," published August 27. He and his co-author looked at where high school students send their SAT scores, and what effects athletic success had on those decisions. They found that universities received up to 10 percent more scores from potential students when a school "has a stellar year in basketball or football." 
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  • CHICAGO TRIBUNE. Research by Associate Professor Devin Pope was featured in an article headlined "The Wal-Mart effect on home values," published June 7. Values increase an average of 2 to 3 percent for homes within half a mile of a Wal-Mart store, according to the research. 
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  • CNBC ASIA. Professor Randall Kroszner talked about whether central banks might inject liquidity into the markets ahead of elections in Greece, Egypt and France, during an interview broadcast June 15. 
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  • U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT. Professor Pradeep Chintagunta was one of the experts cited in an article headlined "Broken Windows: How Microsoft Can Pull Ahead in the Tech Game," published July 20. "It takes a while for a platform to catch on, then there’s a massive growth spurt, then things stabilize and slowly start to decline," Professor Chintagunta said. The problem is that Microsoft may be stuck in that last phase, he added. 
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  • CNBC.COM. Research by Professor Abbie Smith was featured in an article headlined "If the CEO Owns a Yacht, Should You Sell the Stock?" posted June 11. Professor Smith and her co-authors found that companies run by free-spending CEOs are more likely to have accounting fraud, financial restatements and value-destroying deals, the article said. 
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  • FOX BUSINESS. Professor Austan Goolsbee said we shouldn’t underestimate the fiscal cliff the U.S. is facing during an interview broadcast June 21. 
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  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Research by Professor Ayelet Fishbach was featured in the "Week in Ideas" column published August 3. People tend to let their ethical guard – and their standards – down during the middle of a series of events, Professor Fishbach found. 
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  • FOREIGN POLICY. Professor Reid Hastie was quoted in an article headlined "EuroFail, How many summits does it take to NOT solve the eurocrisis?" published June 28. "As a general rule, meetings make individuals perform below their capacity and skill level," he said. "Please, don’t just call a meeting and hope the magic happens. Take charge and take personal responsibility for meeting its objectives, whatever they are." 
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  • HUFFINGTON POST. Adjunct Assistant Professor John Paul Rollert wrote a column titled "Six Principles for Business Ethics," July 11. The column contained excerpts from statements by six Booth students who were asked to define their professional principles. 
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  • NBC CHICAGO.COM. Adjunct Assistant Professor Jason Blumberg was named one of Chicago’s top "eco-preneurs," in an article posted July 8. His two companies, Revolution Environmental and Energy Results "revolve around understanding how people’s use of energy affects the world," the article said. 
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  • BBC RADIO. Professor Randall Kroszner discussed the fine against Barclays PLC in connection with allegations of LIBOR rate setting during an interview broadcast June 27.
  • AMERICAN BANKER. Professor Steven Kaplan was quoted in an article about Bain Capital headlined "Boston Buyout Firm Cashes In by Adding Value," published June 27. "Bain hit early on the model in private equity that everybody is following," he said. "What Bain did, and more and more funds are doing, is add some operational or strategic value" to the companies it invests in.
  • BLOOMBERG NEWS. A labor-market indicator developed by Deputy Dean Steven Davis known as recruiting intensity was featured in an opinion column headlined "Job Openings Aren’t What They Used To Be," published June 19. The indicator tracks various hard-to-measure qualities of job openings, such as how well they are advertised, the toughness of the screening process and the attractiveness of compensation packages, the column said. "Throughout the recent false dawn in the job markets, one thing hasn’t changed much: The low intensity of employers’ efforts to fill vacancies," Bloomberg reported. 
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  • NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO. Professor Luigi Zingales discussed what is needed to keep American companies and individuals from losing faith in government during an interview with NPR’s Planet Money blog. Laws should be made simpler, easier for lawmakers and the public to understand, he said. That makes it harder for companies to game them, and harder to win the kind of special treatment that undermines trust. The interview was posted July 10. 
    Listen to broadcast
  • NATIONAL REVIEW. Professor Reid Hastie was featured in an article headlined "Reid Hastie Explains Almost Every Political Conversation You’ve Ever Had," published June 5. 
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  • CHICAGO TRIBUNE. Clinical Professor James Schrager was quoted in an article about Sara Lee Corp.’s 12-year process of spinning off and selling many of its businesses. "It became very, very profitable to be in a conglomerate and the stock market welcomed and rewarded executives who went out and brought other companies," he said. However, "by the mid-80’s everyone figured out it was a temporary gain," he said. The article was published June 23. 
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Section 3: Booth students and alumni in the news.

  • CHICAGO TRIBUNE. Mark Hoplamazian, MBA ’89, was featured in the executive profile column July 9. He is president and CEO of Hyatt Hotels. When he graduated from Booth, Hoplamazian was hired by Chicago dealmaker Jay Pritzker to work on new investments and acquisitions, the article said. Hyatt, the Pritzker family’s "crown jewel," went public in 2009 but is still majority-owned by family interests, the article said. 
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  • Barron’s also published a feature on Hoplamazian, July 14. "Mark Hoplamazian helped the Pritzker family assemble the Hyatt Hotels business, and then found himself running it. So far, he’s doing great," Barron’s reported. 
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  • CHICAGO TRIBUNE. Braintree, a company founded by Bryan Johnson, MBA ’07, plans to hire 150 employees in Chicago during the next few years, according to an article published July 31. The online payments technology company won Booth’s 2007 New Venture Challenge. 
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  • The Chicago Tribune ran a separate story September 25 reporting that GrubHub and BenchPrep, two companies that also got their start at Booth, will hire large numbers of employees soon. GrubHub tied for first place in the 2006 New Venture Challenge and BenchPrep won in 2010. 
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  • THE ECONOMIST. Ricardo Taveira, MBA ’13, wrote a column about his search for a summer internship in private equity and venture capital. "While others in his class were deciding between multiple job offers, Ricardo Taveira, an MBA student at Chicago Booth, was playing a game of brinkmanship," the headline said. 
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  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Matt Maloney, MBA ’10, co-founder and CEO of GrubHub, wrote a column about his entrepreneurial experience, published August 23. "I have come to believe that the only way to truly test the validity of your product is to put it in front of your customers," he wrote. "I also believe that you have to be prepared to abandon an idea if there is no customer interest, or if you can’t modify your product to meet customer needs." GrubHub, an online food ordering service in 400 cities, tied for first place in Booth’s New Venture Challenge in 2006. 
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  • CHICAGO SUN-TIMES. Jillian Schwartz, MBA ’14, was featured in an article about her participation in the London Olympics as a pole vaulter for Team Israel. The August 1 article mentioned that she will attend Booth beginning in September. 
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  • CRAIN’S CHICAGO BUSINESS. Sean Harper, MBA ’09, was quoted in an article headlined "The story behind Groupon’s credit-card processing business." Harper is Groupon’s director of product management for payments. Previously he was founder and CEO of FeeFighters, which was purchased by Groupon last year. FeeFighters "got its start at the University of Chicago Booth School of business and was backed by local investors," the September 20 article said. 
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  • BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK. Neal Nisargand, MBA ’14, will write periodically about his experiences at Booth as one of the magazine’s MBA journal writers, according to an article published September 13. 
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  • BLOOMBERG NEWS. Daniel Ivascyn, MBA ’98, was named the top performing bond picker at Pacific Investment Management Co. in the Bloomberg Riskless Return Ranking published August 29. Ivascyn runs the $11.2 billion Pimco Income Fund, which rose 13.8 percent in the past five years, according to the article. 
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  • BARRON’S. David Kirchhoff, M.B.A. ’94, was profiled in the CEO Spotlight column headlined "Fighting Fat and Winning," published September 10. He is CEO of Weight Watchers International. It was at Booth where "his brain lit up," the article said. "Surrounded by competitive students, Kirchhoff worked hard, graduated at the top of his class, and was hired by Boston Consulting Group." 
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  • PENSIONS & INVESTMENTS. Keith Breslauer, MBA ‘88, was featured in an article headlined "The three worlds of Patron Capital’s Keith Breslauer," published September 17. He is the founder, managing director and senior partner of Patron Capital, a $3.1 billion private equity firm based in London. He also is a member of Booth’s Global Advisory Board Europe, Middle East and Africa Cabinet. 
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  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Scott Griffith, MBA ’90, was profiled September 18. He is CEO and chairman of Zipcar Inc. When asked what wisdom he would give to the future leaders of Zipcar, he responded, "If you really don’t have passion for what you’re doing, quit." 
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  • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Ronald Rubin, MBA ’85, was profiled in the Bankruptcy Beat Snapshot September 21. Formerly an attorney with the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau which looks at the operations of banks and financial institutions, Rubin is now with the law firm of Hunton & Williams "in a spot to help companies that have caught the agency’s eye," the article said. 
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  • INQUIRER (Manila). Aristotle Dimitui, MBA ’10, was profiled in an article headlined "Exec combines, work, studies to run pharmaceutical firm in Myanmar," published September 1. He is Country General Manager of United Pharmaceutical Co. in Myanmar. His experiences in Booth’s Executive MBA Program in Asia helped him improve his managerial skills and expanded his network, according to the article. 
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  • CRAIN’S CHICAGO BUSINESS. A Q&A was published with Adrissha Wimberly, MBA ’10 and Charisse Conanan, MBA ’10, co-founders of Smarteys. "Our professors and fellow classmates (at Booth) who had diverse experiences" were instrumental in helping us develop and launch the company, Wimberly said in the article published August 29. 
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  • CRAIN’S CHICAGO BUSINESS. Dhiraj Rajaram, MBA ’03, was featured in an article about Mu Sigma, the company he founded soon after graduating from Booth. The company has attracted $150 million from venture investors and employs 1,700 people, the July 30 article said. Mu Sigma is the largest firm in the world focused solely on data analytics, Rajaram said. 
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  • STRAITS TIMES (Singapore). Lim Shyong Piau, MBA ’12, was featured in an article headlined "How much is that MBA worth?" published August 27. "I have come to appreciate economics in a more holistic manner," he said, adding that "one can apply economic models and concepts to marketing, pricing, strategy and even politics and ethics." Lim is managing director of Invesco Asset Management, Singapore, and a graduate of the EMBA program in Asia. 
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  • CRAIN’S CHICAGO BUSINESS. Carl Tannenbaum, MBA ’84, was named chief economist at Northern Trust Corp., Chicago’s largest bank, according to an article published July 16. Previously he was senior vice president and head of the risk division at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. 
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  • FORBES. Liz Kammel, a student in the Weekend MBA Program, published a column headlined "8 Ways Business School Can Be An Incubator For Your Startup," July 23. In March of 2011 she began work on ZipFit.me. "I think like an entrepreneur," she wrote. "That works well when you’re an entrepreneur – but what is an investor thinking? Taking classes like Commercializing Innovation by (Clinical Professor) Scott Meadow at Booth taught me exactly that." 
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  • Crain’s Chicago Business ran a story about ZipFit.me August 28. 
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  • TODAY’S CHICAGO WOMAN. Coco Meers, MBA ’13, was included on the list of "100 Women to Watch," published in the July issue. Co-founder of the web-based beauty community Pretty Quick, she is "an absolute rising star," the magazine said. 
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  • WINE SPECTATOR. Pooneet Kant, MBA ’13, and Allison Fortune, ’13, were quoted in a July 3 article about the Left Bank Bordeaux Cup, a university wine club competition in France. Booth finished second among 42 teams. The finals were held at Chateau Lafite Rothschild. France’s Ecole des Hautes Etudes Commerciales du Nord Lille (EDHEC Lillie) won the event. 
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  • BUSINESS BECAUSE. Daniel Gargiulo, MBA ’13 and Sabrine Waismann, MBA ’13 were featured in an article headlined "Why European MBA students love Chicago," published May 25. 
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  • BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK. George Kadifa, MBA ’89, was named executive vice president of the Hewlett Packard software business, according to an item published June 7.
  • CRAIN’S CHICAGO BUSINESS. Michael Mikhail, Ph.D. ‘99, was named dean of the University of Illinois at Chicago’s College of Business Administration, according to an article published June 12. Previously he was a professor at Arizona State University’s W.P. Carey School of Business. 
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  • THE SACRAMENTO BEE. Debra Crew, MBA ’00, was named president, PepsiCo Americas Beverages, according to an announcement August 16.