Alumni
Alumnus to Lead European Program

Corporations
Siebel Funds Scholarships

Off Campus
GSB Cow Auctioned
Events
European Reunion Brings Alumni to Spain

On Campus
Comdisco CEO Says Service Equals Success

Staff
Gaillard and Sack Assume New Roles
Faculty
Kroszner Awarded Brattle Prize

Rossi Receives Kelly Prize

Fundraising
Major Gifts from Alumni Launch Capital Campaign
Who's News
GSB Alumni in the News

Being There: West Quest

What Good is an M.B.A.?

Focus On: Gleacher Challenge
Alumni Meet the Challenge

Clips

Alumnus to Lead European Program
José Luis Bobes, IXP-3 (’98), joined Chicago GSB as director of the Executive M.B.A. Program Europe. Bobes, a native of Spain, returns to his homeland after spending seven years abroad. Bobes has worked for Honeywell throughout his career, primarily in marketing. Prior to his appointment, he spent 16 months working for the firm in Minneapolis. Fluent in four languages, Bobes has worked in Spain, Germany, eastern Europe, and the United States.

“Given this background, José Luis was the ideal candidate for the Barcelona position,” said Bill Kooser, ’81, associate dean for executive M.B.A. programs. “We are very excited to have him on board with us and look forward to
continued success in the Executive M.B.A. Program Europe with him
at the helm.”—A.D.
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Siebel Funds Scholarships
Chicago GSB received a $2.6 million gift this spring as part of a new program sponsored by Siebel Systems Inc., a supplier of e-business application software. The Siebel Scholars Program will provide five $25,000 scholarships to the top five academic achievers in the GSB’s campus program after their first year of study.

Five other business schools will participate in the Siebel Scholars Program: Harvard, MIT, Northwestern, Stanford, and Wharton. An annual conference that will include past and present scholarship recipients will rotate between the six schools.

GSB alumnus Howard Graham, ’73, is chief financial officer of Siebel.—M.M.B.
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GSB Cow Auctioned
When the city of Chicago’s popular cow exhibit ended last fall, it was time to find a permanent home for the GSB’s Market Moo Cow.

To sell the cow—a mixed media creation covered with newspaper stock pages designed by Gleacher Center architect Lohan Associates—the school set up an online auction.

Bovine bidding began at $250, and Chicago Partners L.L.C. took home the cow with a bid of $6,650. According to president Roger Hickey, ’88, the economics and finance consulting firm bought the GSB cow because it was a good fit. “We have many Chicago alumni associated with the firm, and we use tools from Chicago in a lot of the work we do,” Hickey explained. “It made sense to have this cow in our lobby in the Loop.”—M.M.B.
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European Reunion Brings Alumni to Spain
A record crowd of nearly 200 alumni from more than 18 countries gathered in Barcelona in February for the GSB’s European reunion.

The program featured social, networking, and continuing education opportunities. Roman Weil, V. Duane Rath Professor of Accounting, offered a well-attended “Back to the Classroom” session. An afternoon focused on e-commerce was popular, with sessions on business-to-business and business-to-consumer operations. The weekend also featured a career assessment panel with participants from A.T. Kearney and Diageo. Dean Robert S. Hamada was on hand to talk with alumni over lunch and to conduct a “town meeting.”

Alumni also had the opportunity to tour Barcelona, network over breakfast, and dine at a top restaurant. For more information on upcoming alumni events, call the Office of Alumni Affairs and Special Events at 773.702.7727.—M.M.B.
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Comdisco CEO Says Service Equals Success
More entrepreneurial Internet companies eventually will compete on service and quality rather than just uniqueness, according to Nick Pontikes, president and CEO of Comdisco, a Chicago-based Fortune 500 technology services firm. While on campus in February, Pontikes advised entrepreneurial students to concentrate on creating the best Internet firm in a certain industry or field.

“A lot of companies are starting to effectively differentiate themselves based on their service,” Pontikes said. “Many Internet companies fail to provide quality service because they place too much emphasis on trying to be the first to start a unique type of Internet business.”

The high-speed economy has changed the pace of start-ups. While companies routinely took five to seven years to go public, now many are going public in less than 12 months. While this may at first seem like an indicator of success, that’s not necessarily true, Pontikes said. Amazon.com has become popular not because it was the first business to sell discount books over the Internet, but because it provides the most convenient and efficient service.

Despite its popularity, Pontikes said, calling Amazon a success is a subject under debate (see
“Clips”). Amazon relies on shareholders and venture capitalists to subsidize its book discounts, he said, and neither Amazon nor the other top 20 Internet firms have yet shown a profit.—A.D.
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Gaillard and Sack Assume New Roles
As the GSB enters the first year of its capital campaign (see “Making History”), two staff members have taken on new roles.

Karen Gaillard, formerly director of corporate relations, has been promoted to senior director, major and capital gifts. Her new responsibilities include overseeing the efforts of the major gift team; working with campaign volunteers; maintaining major gift accounts in Florida, in Chicago, and on the East Coast; and raising money to support campaign needs. Gaillard joined the school in 1996 as associate director of major gifts.

David Sack has been named director of corporate relations. In his new role, he will work to develop relationships with and raise money from the corporate community. He joined the GSB in 1996 as associate director of corporate relations, raising unrestricted money and working with student groups. A GSB student, Sack expects to graduate from the evening program in August.—M.M.B.
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Kroszner Awarded Brattle Prize
Professor of economics Randall Kroszner was awarded the 1999 Brattle Prize, an annual honor that recognizes the best corporate finance paper published in the Journal of Finance.

Kroszner’s winning paper, Were the Good Old Days That Good? Changes in Managerial Stock Ownership Since the Great Depression, was published in the April 1999 issue of the journal. The article was coauthored by Clifford Holderness of Boston College and Dennis Sheehan of Penn State. The prize comes with a $10,000 award.

Kroszner, who joined the GSB in 1990, is the 1999–2000 John M. Olin Fellow in Law and Economics at the University of Chicago Law School. He also is associate director of the George J. Stigler Center for the Study of the Economy and the State.

To read the full text of the winning paper, go online to
kroszner.pdf.—M.M.B.
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Rossi Receives Kelly Prize
Peter Rossi, Joseph T. Lewis Professor of Marketing, was awarded the Arthur L. Kelly Faculty Prize for Exceptional Service this spring. Rossi was selected by a committee that included students, senior staff, and members of the dean’s office.

“The committee chose Professor Rossi for his leadership, guidance, and hard work in building up the marketing group and raising its profile in the business community,” Dean Robert S. Hamada said in the award announcement. In addition, Rossi was recognized for his tireless work in faculty recruiting, course scheduling, executive education, and fundraising; his commitment to establish a first-rate senior faculty in marketing while scoring numerous successes in the junior faculty market; and his many years of service on the Faculty Policy Committee.

The Kelly Faculty Prize was endowed in 1999 by Arthur L. Kelly, XP-20 (’64), managing partner of KEL Enterprises, former Council member, and trustee of the university. The award recognizes exceptional efforts from faculty in promotion and support of the school and its programs.—M.M.B.
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Major Gifts from Alumni Launch Capital Campaign
When Chicago GSB kicked off its $175 million capital campaign (see “Making History”), alumni and friends had already pledged more than $80 million. Some of the earliest support—combined gifts of more than $42 million—came from three alumni: Robert Rothman, ’77; Dennis Keller, ’68; and Andrew Alper, A.B. ’80, M.B.A. ’81, and his wife, Sharon Sadow Alper, A.B. ’80, J.D. ’84.

Rothman, chairman and CEO of Black Diamond Capital Corporation in Tampa, Florida, pledged $12 million to the campaign.

“I suspect many universities have lost sight of their true educational mission,” Rothman said. “I believe in what this institution stands for. Supporting the university in its efforts to maintain its recognition as one of the preeminent educational institutions in the world is a privilege.”

Alper, who with his wife pledged $5 million, said he hoped his gift would especially inspire younger alumni to participate in the campaign.

“Many of us have done very well in this growing economy,” said Alper, chief operating officer of the investment banking division of Goldman, Sachs & Co. and co-chair of the campaign. “We must share our success by giving something back to the school that helped us succeed.”

Keller, co-chair of the campaign, pledged $25 million, the largest single gift ever received by the school. Keller, chairman and CEO of DeVry Inc. and cofounder of the Keller Graduate School of Management, said he wanted to do everything he could to “pay back with interest” the investment made in him by the GSB so that future generations may have the same opportunity.

“The GSB is absolutely the best place for research and teaching about business at the graduate level. This campaign is what we need to do now to make sure that statement remains true well into the 21st century.”—M.M.B.
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