Faculty & Research

Matthew Gentzkow

Richard O. Ryan Professor of Economics

Phone :
1-773-834-2177
Address :
5807 South Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637

Matthew Gentzkow is Richard O. Ryan Professor of Economics and Neubauer Faculty Fellow at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He studies empirical industrial organization and political economy, with a specific focus on media industries.

Gentzkow's work has been published in the Journal of Political Economy, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the American Economic Review, and Econometrica, and has been covered in major national media. Gentzkow received an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship in 2009, and the 2014 John Bates Clark Medal, given by the American Economic Association to the American economist under the age of forty who has made the most significant contribution to economic thought and knowledge. He has also been awarded several National Science Foundation grants for research on media, and a Faculty Excellence Award for teaching. He hopes his students learn to "ask more questions, think critically, and realize that many arguments that sound good aren't."

He was educated at Harvard University, where he earned a bachelor's degree in 1997, a master's degree in 2002, and a PhD in 2004 in economics.

 

2014 - 2015 Course Schedule

Number Name Quarter
33913 Economics of Communication 2015 (Spring)
42001 Competitive Strategy 2015 (Winter)

Other Interests

Mountains, Go, bikes, food.

 

Research Activities

Industrial organization; political economy.

With Bart Bronnenberg and Jean-Pierre Dube, "The Evolution of Brand Preferences: Evidence from Consumer Migration," American Economic Review (forthcoming).

With Jesse M. Shapiro, "Ideological Segregation Online and Offline," Quarterly Journal of Economics (2011).

With Emir Kamenica, "Bayesian Persuasion," American Economic Review (2011).

With Jesse M. Shapiro, "What Drives Media Slant? Evidence from U.S. Daily Newspapers, Econometrica (2010).

"Valuing New Goods in a Model with Complementarities: Online Newspapers," American Economic Review (2007).